This week, a video of a woman trying on a Star Wars Chewbacca mask took the internet by storm. With almost 140 million views at last count, Candace Payne’s Facebook video has become the most popular Facebook Live video of all time.  

In an equally impressive feat, the Brand Kohl’s, where the mask was purchased, responded quickly. Allegedly the mask is now sold out in stores around the world.

So what about this video is an example of social media done right, and what can other brands learn from this video about influencer marketing an authenticity? The brand newsroom team discuss.

Show Notes

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Authenticity is key to effective influencer marketing
  • Viral videos can rarely be constructed

“We overthink things sometimes, and sometimes just getting in the car is the correct approach.” — James 

  • Humour is a great way to build an audience
  • Viewers seek out good news

“We needed something to lighten us up… Sometimes people just want to laugh” — Nic

  • Inauthenticity can be a death sentence to a brand
  • Influencers need to be carefully selected

“Brands are so hot to get involved in influencer marketing. Are you paying too much money? Are you getting the results you should, and is the person that you’re engaging really going to do anything for your brand? — Sarah

Here are the links you might need

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic were joined by Kohen Grogan to discuss how to measure return on investment on social media

And here’s a discussion about how to effectively market with a limited budget

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You’ve probably seen examples of businesses using location services, but have you considered how you could use them in your own business? Adam Mullett, marketing manager from NGIS, shares terrific examples of how marketers can use mapping tools to tell better stories and provide a visual element to information they’re presenting to their customers.

Adam says using location intelligence allows marketers to provide an excellent customer experience by adding additional value that goes beyond selling products or services. Providing helpful information to customers about things like parking availability, traffic alerts and even helping travellers navigate the complexities of international banking are all within reason.

Here’s the best part for small business. You don’t necessarily need your own location services to get the benefit. A lot of other applications may be including you in their mapping products. Think about popular apps like Yelp or Trip Advisor that automatically identify you on a map when people are looking for products and services in your location.

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Location services provide a way for marketers to add value to their customer experience.
  • Even small businesses have an opportunity to develop visual content using mapping technology.

‘The only thing that limits business right now is your imagination and how you can use [location services]’. — Sarah

  • 80% of any data has some sort of spatial component you can plot on a map.
  • A lot of data sits in the public domain that even small business can utilise.

‘Maps are all about finding relationships between data. We’re humans; we’re really geared up to see patterns; we love pictures’. — Adam

  • Mapping technology is becoming a lot easier to use. It’s not beyond the average marketer to start telling stories using integrated tools between things like email services and mapping technology.
  • Make sure your business is listed on Google with the correct address. It helps customers find you and also has a positive impact on your SEO rankings.

‘Today, maps can change the way that we look at businesses and organisations because we can find them easily. We can use them in just about everything we’re going to do today’. — Nic

Here are the links you might need

  • For marketing analytics:

Linking MailChimp to CartoDB (easy-to-learn web visualisation software) to get heat maps or temporal maps of opens is especially useful for national or distributed databases of clients.

  • For enhanced content marketing:

Esri Story Maps – make your story come to life with maps. Easy to make, get the impressive functionality of the enterprise-level software from Esri.

Google Maps For Work provides industry-specific demos to get you thinking about how you can tell better stories with maps. 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at how brand storytelling improves the customer experience.

 

And here’s a discussion about online reviews with Nic Lembo from Yelp.

 

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Journalism is changing fast. Newsrooms are shrinking, news is published online first, and the “hungry beast” that is publishing requires more content than ever before. So how do we communicate with journalists effectively to give our story pitch the best possible chance of success?

Simon Holt, a veteran journalist with Australia’s Fairfax Media in Brisbane, has written a book crammed with useful tips for anyone communicating with reporters. It’s called 101 Ways to Connect with Modern Newsrooms. James and Nic spoke to Simon Holt:

 

Here are some key take-outs:

“This book has put in writing the words that every journalist has been wanting to say.” — Nic

  • As newsrooms go “digital first”, they are also shrinking. That’s where the opportunity exists for public relations.
  • Digital news comes with a lot of analytics that help journalists tune their stories to what people want, which couldn’t happen in print.
  • Don’t sell a story to a journalist, sell a story to the audience the journalist is serving.

“There is immense opportunity for the PR industry to capitalise on what’s happening. — Simon Holt

  • Journalists are not experts in everything and they’re open to actual experts contacting them to share their knowledge because it helps the debate.
  • You don’t need to be controversial to get coverage, you just need to be different.
  • Make it easy for the journalist. Get to the point quickly and provide everything “on a plate”.

“The little hook — the point where people’s eyebrows raise and they say ‘tell me more about that’, that’s where the story needs to go — that’s the gist of it.” — James

  • Don’t send it out mass press releases; target a reporter and a publication with a tailored communication.
  • Journalists are not the enemy. If you understand them and their audience you will succeed.

Here are the links you might need

  • To take advantage of Simon Holt’s offer to Brand Newsroom listeners of free postage with a copy of 101 Ways to Connect with Modern Newsrooms, email him directly at sholt@fairfaxmedia.com.au.
  • You can also buy a copy of Simon’s book here.  
  • Follow Simon Holt on Twitter

 

Simon Holt’s book

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Jo McManus from Edith Cowan University about the future of brand journalism.

 

And here’s a discussion with Carla Johnson, author of Experiences: The Seventh Era of Marketing.

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Are you too sexy for LinkedIn? That’s the question photographer Julissa Shrewsbury posed in a recent blog post designed to get people thinking about what the images they use on social media say about their level of professionalism.

It got the Brand Newsroom team thinking about personal branding. Julissa joined James, Nic and Sarah for a chat.

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  • People make a judgement very quickly and first impressions stick. Don’t forget people are probably meeting you first online, not in person, these days.
  • You can look attractive in your image but if you’re trying to look “sexy”, it’s probably inappropriate for your brand.

“If you are trying to project a sexy image, it’s probably the wrong image for work—unless you are a sex worker.” — Sarah

  • If your image does not look professional, you’re doing yourself and your business an injustice.
  • It’s hard for people to take the information on someone’s professional page seriously if they aren’t dressed appropriately, looking smart, and in an appropriate setting or context.

“We have got to remember that every time we put something out there it’s so shareable… you have to have that professional look for your visuals—you can’t take a selfie.” — Nic

  • It’s still possible to look creative or attractive, just dress appropriately for your audience (both in your photographs and in your day-to-day).
  • You want to look professional and approachable. Working with a photographer you trust will help you achieve that.
  • Smile!

“A closed mouth smile does not give a message of friendly and approachable. As much as people tend to hate their own smile, other people love their smile. It’s your most natural look.” — Julissa Shrewsbury

Here are the links you might need

Have you heard the one about…

In this episode of Brand Newsroom James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at the role of photography in content.

 

And in case you missed it, last week the team caught up with Rebecca Lieb to talk about the metrics marketers most often overlook.

 

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Give us a follow.

Subscribe or leave a review.