Audiences aren’t what they used to be — and nor are demographics. This week one of Australia’s major banks, the Commonwealth, released a report showing just how different the Australian population looks today compared to the past. It tells us that traditional assumptions about demographics are broken. In today’s Brand Newsroom, James and Sarah take a close look at why it’s important to segment your audience rather than use outdated demographic assumptions.

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Marketers have been slow to adapt to the need to (and the ability to) segment their marketing to communicate with discrete audiences.
  • It’s now possible to target very specific target markets within your larger audience. Hit them with messaging that resonates, not a “one size fits all”.

“Any time you understand your audience and you can market to that audience in a way that resonates with them, you’re going to win. — Sarah

 

  • Consumers aren’t relying on salespeople for information any longer, they’re doing their own research online.
  • If you’re relying on traditional demographics, you’re probably in trouble. Consumers and their needs don’t fall into the simple categories we’ve always used. For example, single people aren’t necessarily young people.

“If you’re marketing, it’s the ‘Peter Pans’ you want to tap into — they’re… young at heart, living independently, enabled by the latest technology… they’re the ones theoretically who have got all the money and want to spend it on doing crazy things.” — James

 

  • Don’t make assumptions about who your audience is, find out who they actually are, then make sure that you’re getting your marketing right.
  • For example, if some people aged 70 think “70 is the new 30” you can’t market to them with picture of a grey-haired person and a Zimmer frame.

“I think what this report does is it really shows how you cannot say just because you’re aged between 18 and 24 you’re X and because you’re aged between 30 and 40 you are Y. It doesn’t work like that any more.” — James

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic were joined by Lush Digital’s managing editor Dan Hatch, for a chat about article idea generation.

 

And here’s a discussion with Rebecca Lieb about the metrics marketers often overlook.

 

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The news been really depressing lately, with so much death, destruction, doom and gloom. Why is it that the news always seems to focus on the negative? And is there room for more positive news? James and Nic take a look at good news versus bad news and the opportunity that creates for marketers.

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • Reporters aren’t just looking for the negative in a story, it’s their job to test the positive. It’s how they cut through the “spin”.
  • But the media, recognising the public distaste for the negative, has now said “let’s make space for the positives”. And that’s creating an opportunity for brands.

“There’s an appetite for the positive and brands need to find a way to make something that’s a negative in tone and turn it into something that can be seen in a positive light. — Nic

 

  • Out of every negative there’s a positive that can be found around it.
  • Social media is a great space to spread a positive message. It’s a place people go to escape and have a laugh. It’s also where people go to find a new angle or an interesting twist on a story.

“When we turn on the television, turn on the radio or open the newspaper, it may well be a very different discussion to the one we’re seeing on social media. What you see come out in social media is some of the human stories and some of the positive stories.” — James

 

  • Make sure your “good news” message is still aligned with your brand.
  • A good story will continue to circulate.

 

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at the art of public speaking.

 

And here’s a discussion about how to pitch to journalists.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

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Public speaking is a vital skill for anyone in business, yet so many of us are bad at it. The Brand Newsroom team has been delivering presentations for years. Today they swap notes and share advice to help you make your presentations the engaging, lead-generating business tools you need them to be.

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Being able to present well allows you to demonstrate your knowledge, authority and expertise. It helps people connect with you and understand where you’re coming from.
  • It adds an element of the “personal” that sending email or giving them written information to read simply cannot do.

“When you can stand up and talk with ease and confidence about something, people really respond to that”. — Sarah

 

  • You don’t need to be cut and polished with everything you say, but talk with a clear objective. Leave the audience with a clear idea of what to do next.
  • Put some expression and some personality into your presentation. So many presentations are dull and almost ‘proforma’.

“It comes back to authenticity. In general life we don’t have everything scripted. If we’re meeting with someone and we’re telling them about our brand-new fantastic idea, we don’t suddenly whip out our PointPoint presentation”. — James

 

  • Make sure you know your material. If the power went out, you still want to be able to get your message across. When you practice, say it out loud. That’s the difference between a speaker and a good speaker.
  • This is NOT the same as being scripted. Scripted presentations do not feel authentic. You’re busy thinking about the next word, not the meaning of what you’re trying to say. You will lose connection with the audience.
  • If you’re using slides, they should really just be a queue for you to mark transitions. They shouldn’t be overloaded with text. These also allow you to be flexible.

“The people in the audience don’t want you to fail; they want you to succeed. They’re there to listen to you; you’re the expert. You’re the person they want to hear from”. — Nic

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at the benefits of podcasting for brands.

 

And here’s a discussion about where to share your content.


Like what you’ve heard?

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One of the most common questions journalists get asked is ‘where do you get all your stories from?’ Generating story ideas is a reporter’s bread and butter and these days it’s also an essential skill for the content marketer. Today, the Brand Newsroom chats with longtime reporter (and content marketer) Dan Hatch about how to generate article ideas like a journalist.

Here are some key take-outs

  • You’re never starting with a blank sheet of paper. News is always happening. You just need to work out what the angle is that suits your brand and that your audience will find interesting.
  • Open the paper. Open Google. Open Twitter’s Trending Topics. These places will tell you what people are talking about.

“Go away and ask people in your own team, in your own business. They’re the greatest resource when it comes to generating ideas”. — Nic

 

  • Run an editorial calendar. Keep an eye on the events that are coming up — be it a holiday, an International Day of Whatever-it-is, or even the new season of Game of Thrones You can plan great and relevant content well in advance because you know these are things people will be talking about down the track.

“Your clients may not realise the really good stories they’re sitting on either because they don’t have the editorial experience, or ‘news sense’, or they’re too close to it and they just don’t see it”. — Dan

 

  • Use your curiosity, use your contacts. Make sure your articles are a two-way street. Invite feedback. Get people bringing stories to you, but don’t be afraid to reach out and ask questions because curiosity is a fantastic way to find really interesting story ideas.
  • Use social media to interact with your audience. You should be following influencers. If you begin to understand what’s important to your influencers, you’ll have so much opportunity to get them to comment on your stories, appear on your podcast, appear in your video series, etc.

“I keep a folder with original research, survey results, and so on – these are coming out all through the year. If you go back and really mine through those, you can draw so many stories from them — beyond the headline figures”. — Sarah


Here are the links you might need

  • Here’s a blog post by Dan Hatch explaining where journalists get their ideas. There are a lot more tips for generating story ideas there.
  • Here’s another post by Dan talking about the importance of value-adding on your editorial offering if you want to grow your audience.

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently Dan joined James, Sarah and Nic to talk about managing editorial workflow.

 

And here’s a discussion with reporter Simon Holt about how to pitch to journalists.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

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