Today the Brand Newsroom team looks at how brands use humour to interact with their customers on social media. Is it ever a good idea? Or can it spectacularly backfire? And, sometimes, are brands perhaps using humour in the hope they will “go viral”, rather than focusing on first marketing principles and giving customers the good service they expect.

 

First up, here’s the article about Tesco responding to the tweet about their mobile product.

  • Interacting with customers on social can be an opportunity to be funny but there’s also an opportunity to offend people — so be careful how you do it.
  • Sarcasm doesn’t work. People don’t like seeing that come from brands. Be self-effacing.
  • Don’t ever make fun of natural or human disasters.

“You could easily just ignore it but Tesco has jumped on it, they’ve seen it as an opportunity to be witty and capture some attention.” — James

 

  • Monitor how your brand name is being used on social and respond to it if necessary — whether that’s with humour or not.
  • Consumers like it when two brands interact on social with humour.

“You don’t want to offend people, you want to bring people along.” — Sarah

 

  • While marketing managers might want to “go viral”, it’s not always in the best interest of the brand. Ask yourself why you’re doing it before you try to “go viral”.
  • If you’re going to use humour it should be part of your strategy — know how you’re going to use it, have guidelines, stick to them.
  • Have some courage. It can pay off.

“There are certain brands out there that try a little too hard. It’s very obvious and you will pay for it.” — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need

  • Sarah mentioned Mention, the social media monitoring service. You can find it here.
  • Here’s an article about the Greggs and Google back-and-forth from a couple of years ago.
  • If you want to know more about Charmin’s #tweetfromtheseat, check out this article.
  • You can #dunkinthedark with Oreo’s here. And the movie theatre’s reply is here.
  • Take a look at Black Milk Clothing’s social media humour disaster here. And here’s Luton Airport’s.
  • Here’s James’s hilarious example of a pun-filled (and rather fishy) Twitter exchange.
  • But really, the most fun you will have today is watching the John West ad Nic mentioned (it has actually been voted “the best ad of all time” in some polls).

 

Have you heard the one about…

Here’s James, Sarah and Nic’s discussion with Jordana Borensztijn about using humour in your content…

 

And here’s a discussion from last week about dealing with PR disasters…

 

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Brands can’t afford to be “faceless” organisations. They need to interact with their customers, engage with them, gauge their reactions and get their feedback. In-Person events are a great way to do that.

This week’s guest, Meesha Stacker, has been working in events for a decade. For the past three-and-a-half years she has been at acQuire Technology Solutions — a data management mining software company — where she has implemented a very successful events strategy.

Today the Brand Newsroom team chats to Meesha about how to get in-person events right.

Here are some key take-outs:

  • In-person events work because they are an opportunity to work with your customers in an environment where they can relax, take in your content, and provide an immediate reaction.
  • Have an events strategy and make sure it aligns with your marketing strategy.
  • You can repurpose event content into multiple formats for weeks or even months afterward.

“If you look at the Content Marketing Institute’s research in-person events are the number one content marketing tactic for both B2B and B2C. — Sarah

 

  • Measure your success based on feedback from customers. Ask them for that feedback.
  • Use each event as a way to create all kinds of content. Reinvent and recycle the one idea. For example, conferences and webinars can become blog posts and presentations to share in other ways.

“I love in-person events because they bring out a personality and another kind of connection you could never achieve with a five or six page document. You’re bringing people together and it’s so powerful.” — Nic

 

  • Events do cost money and resources. But it’s possible to do them “smarter” to make them more efficient. Choose your events carefully.
  • Don’t just attend a conference or convention, leverage it. For example, if you have a booth, get speakers along to hold talks.

“We don’t have a huge budget. We’re smart with how we use the money. For each event we put on we make sure we can get the most out of each event… Market leading up to the event and utilise what happened at that event afterwards, so you have that presence for a lot longer.” — Meesha Stacker, acQuire

 

  • ROI can be hard to track sometimes. Work out what you’re basing that ROI on. It might be money coming into the business, or it could be the retention of clients, for example.
  • Ask people for their expertise. They’re most often really happy to help.
  • Follow-up after an event. Thank your guests for coming along. A nice email with pictures taken at the event is great. And take the opportunity to remind them of your website, social media, special hashtags and so on.

“In person events are a way to bring life and personality to your brand. You can make a big and lasting impact with people and it makes them more comfortable doing business with you.” — Meesha

 

Here are the links you might need

  • Here’s that Content Marketing Institute research Sarah mentioned:

BNR102aBNR102b

  • And you can find those statistics in these reports: B2B; B2C.

Have you heard the one about…

Last week James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at dealing with PR disasters, taking lessons from Donald Trump, the Rio Olympics and Delta Airlines, among others…

And here’s a discussion about trust in marketing…

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

After a week in which Rio Olympics diving pool turning green, the Australian Census website crashed and Donald Trump suggested the Second Amendment might provide a way to deal with Hillary Clinton, the Brand Newsroom team takes deep dive into PR disasters.

Here are some key take-outs:

  •  When a PR disaster strikes, take responsibility — don’t obfuscate, indulge in conjecture or go to ground.
  • Keep the public informed. Tell them what you know and what you’re doing to fix it.

“This was so basic it was staggering. It was staggering because everything they were meant to do they didn’t do and everything they did do, they shouldn’t have done. — James on the Australian Census PR disaster

 

  • PR disasters happen: Have a crisis management plan ready to go.
  • You can lose trust with your public quickly if you do something blatantly wrong.

“Trump’s ratings are plummeting, so it’s no longer just ‘crooked Hillary’ we’re hearing about, it’s ‘crooked media’.” — Sarah on Donald Trump’s Second Amendment comments

 

 

  • Be human. Understand what your customer is feeling and not only empathise but show them that you care through your actions. That’s the lesson from last week’s Delta Airlines PR disaster.
  • You have access to your own media platforms, like your website and social media, so communicate directly with your customers through your owned media to make sure your side is out there. Use your leadership team to do it — mainstream media will pick it up.

“You’ve got to take action and you have to deliver (your message) in the way your audience is consuming it, as well. Every leader needs to take responsibility for their communications…because it’s your brand.” — Nic


Here are the links you might need


Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke about the art of giving a good presentation…

 

And here’s a discussion about the communications lessons that can be taken out of Britain’s decision to leave the EU, commonly known as “Brexit”…

 

Like what you’ve heard?

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In the 100th episode of Brand Newsroom the team takes a look back at some of the biggest lessons learned across almost two years of the podcast.

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Publish consistently. Your audience expects it. That might mean allotting regular time in your diary to create your content.
  • Be flexible in your approach to your content. Be open to new and evolving ideas.

“If you serve your audience, you’re going to be rewarded.” — Sarah

  • It’s not about you, it’s about your audience.
  • Tap into your influencers: Your content is going to do better. Put their names in the headline to get your audience’s attention.

“A lot of companies entering the content marketing space are, sadly, still producing content for the boardroom rather than for the audience.” — James

  • Use social media to amplify your content. Engage with your influencers on social and get them to share your content.
  • Recycle your content. Keep putting it out there in as many different ways as possible.
  • Content works forever. If you create something “evergreen”, you’re creating a long-term asset that keeps working to bring in more business.

“It has been a labour of love and it has been such an enjoyment — I’ve thoroughly enjoyed every episode of the one hundred.” — Nic

Here are some of the most popular Brand Newsroom podcasts…

The team speaks to Rand Fishkin about SEO.

And here’s Jay Baer on why praise is overrated…

 

Like what you’ve heard?

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Of the top ten most trusted people in America, five of them are actors — and most are celebrities. That’s according to a Reader’s Digest poll. Why, in 2016, are entertainers (who spend their lives pretending to be someone else) trusted more than politicians and policy-makers or investigative reporters and news anchors? Why are brands like banks and retailers constantly marked down on trust by consumers?

Today, the Brand Newsroom team looks at trust. Who do we trust and why? And how do we build trust where it’s lacking?

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  • The most trusted people on the list were Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock, Denzel Washington and Meryl Streep. Fifth was the late poet and civil rights activist, Maya Angelou.

“We’re living in a crisis of trust. If these are the people we most trust… that’s probably because we don’t know much about them. — Sarah

 

  • A new report from the Governance Institute of Australia (GIA) identified consumers had problems of trust with: politicians, media, banks, large corporations and retailers.
  • What do these groups have in common? They’re all seen as wanting something from the consumer — be it their vote, a purchase, their money, etc.

“There’s a huge opportunity for brands that do want to earn trust… because we can learn from those category and look at what they’re doing and what the opposite of that might be. — James

 

  • The most ethical industries, according to the GIA report, were those known for helping people: not-for-profits, fire and ambulance, education and the health sector.
  • Get into a situation where your brand is helping Change your marketing to use a helpful tone, then you’ll have some purchase with consumers.

“Trust is so easily lost, even if you just take your foot off the pedal a little bit. Don’t take your audience for granted. If you do that, you will fail.” — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need

Have you heard the one about…

Last week James and Sarah took a close look at the death of traditional concepts around demographics.

And here’s a discussion about good news and bad news and how brands can take positive opportunities from negative news.

 

Follow us on Soundcloud for the latest episodes  [otw_shortcode_button href=”https://soundcloud.com/brand_newsroom” size=”medium” icon_position=”left” shape=”radius” color_class=”blue” target=”_blank”]Click here[/otw_shortcode_button]

Subscribe or leave a review on iTunes  [otw_shortcode_button href=”https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/brand-newsroom/id945263756?mt=2″ size=”medium” icon_position=”left” shape=”radius” color_class=”blue” target=”_blank”]Click here[/otw_shortcode_button]