Australian demographer Bernard Salt caused outrage recently when he suggested millennials could afford to buy houses if they stopped spending money on smashed avocado on toast. Brands jumped on it, leveraging the publicity for their own business. Today, the Brand Newsroom team takes a look at marketing opportunism.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • Sometimes a little controversy isn’t a bad thing for your personal brand. If you know how to ride the wave, you can extend your awareness well beyond your usual reach.
  • There can also be an opportunity to hitch a ride on someone else’s controversy, if you respond in a way that supports your brand’s messages and connects well with your audience.

“There was lots of righteous indignation. Social media blew up. People in this demographic took big offence. That’s when Bernard Salt said ‘right, I’m going to take advantage of this and doubled-down and made it bigger and bigger’.” — Sarah

 

  • The only time an observation like Bernard Salt’s goes viral is when it really hurts — when it taps into the truth.
  • Courting controversy can polarize your audience. It can be dangerous for corporate brands. You can be offensive but don’t get your customers offside. You have more leeway with your personal brand.

“I subscribe to the idea that all news is good news. For Bernard Salt this is good because it helps him break into different markets.” — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Bernadette Jiwa about putting the love back into marketing.

 

And here’s a discussion with Content Marketing Institute vice president Michele Linn about the CMI’s 2017 B2B content marketing trends report.

 

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Bernadette Jiwa is one of Australia’s top marketing thinkers. Author of five books including Fortune Cookie Principle and Marketing: A Love Story, her blog — The Story of Telling — was named SmartCompany’s best Australian business blog in 2016. Bernadette challenges us to look differently at how we do marketing. Today she joins the Brand Newsroom team to talk about putting a little bit more love into our marketing.

bernadette

Bernadette Jiwa

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • As old monopolies crumble, brands are starting to see the value in putting a bit more love into their marketing — and that includes getting better at telling stories.
  • Don’t fall in love with your brand’s story first; fall in love with the customer first. Stand in the shoes of the person you’re telling the story to.

“The challenge for us is not to understand our product and how great the story is, the challenge to understand why we made this thing in the first place, who we made it for and why it should matter to them. — Bernadette Jiwa

 

  • Effective storytelling doesn’t have to be written words, it could well be pictures. Some brands use Instagram very effectively to tell their story.
  • Think about what you want each piece of content to do — not just for the brand, but for the client.

“Too often we’re so intent on saying what we want to say that we forget to listen and observe.” — Sarah

 

  • Ideas for blog posts are all around you. Be alert to them.
  • Don’t pad-out your content. It isn’t a school essay — you don’t need to write for length. Be concise.
  • You have to put the time into content. You start from a point of service — hoping people are going to come and read your stuff. Do it because you love it. If you start from that place then you do better work.

“If you don’t like the work that you’re doing, it shows in your work.” — Bernadette Jiwa

 

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Content Marketing Institute vice president Michele Linn about the 2017 trend report for B2B content marketing.

 

And here’s a discussion with Jonathan Crossfield on how to avoid epic social media mistakes.

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

Today Nic Hayes leads a discussion on personal brands. Specifically, how do you create one? What do you need to have in place to give your personal brand the best chance of creating the success you want to achieve? He’s joined by his Media Stable colleagues, general manager Michelle Soia and media engagement manager, Emily Morgan.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • Creating a personal brand means establishing trust with other people as an individual. Once people trust you as a person, they are more likely to come to you as a business.
  • You have control over the image you’re putting out there. So take control.
  • We all already have a personal brand and if you want to leverage that, you need to work out what kind of image you want to promote.

“Keep developing your knowledge. It adds to your personal brand — who you are and how you’re positioned.” — Michelle Soia, general manager, Media Stable

 

  • Have an “elevator pitch” ready. Know how to explain who you are and what you do in brief terms. Make it interesting.
  • People want relationships and a human connection — they like to know the person behind the business.

“It’s all about authenticity. Don’t just think ‘I want to be successful in this area so this is who I have to become’, it’s more about figuring out who you are and honing in on that person.” — Emily Morgan, media engagement manager, Media Stable

 

  • Your personal brand is not your corporate brand — unless you’re Richard Branson. You’re still the same person though. It’s authenticity that allows you to be both.
  • Make sure your social media is up-to-date and represents your brand well. Use a professionally-taken headshot.
  • Define your goals. Know what you want to achieve. Ask for feedback from people about the image you’re projecting.

“Build a strategy around your personal brand. It is different to your business strategy and it does need work — it takes energy and time.” — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Michele Linn about the Content Marketing Institutes trends report for 2017.

 

And here’s a discussion with Jonathan Crossfield on how to avoid epic content marketing mistakes.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

It’s out! The Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs B2B “Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends Report” for 2017 has landed. CMI vice president Michele Linn joined the team to discuss the annual snapshot of the state of business-to-business content marketing in the North American market.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • 62 per cent of marketers say they feel more successful with their content marketing this year than they have in the past.
  • Top performing marketers have a documented strategy, clarity about what success is, commitment to content marketing, and a consistent approach to publication.

“The content marketers that are staying the course are starting to realise that this works. Content marketers have known that for a long time but we’ve been asking our employers and clients to trust us on that.” — Sarah

 

  • 89 per cent of marketers (B2B in North America) are doing content marketing and of the 11 per cent not doing content marketing, 52 per cent plan to start within the next year.
  • Businesses and brands that are struggling with content marketing aren’t actually doing content marketing, they’re just using content in their marketing. Content in marketing does not equal content marketing.

“We took a new look at the data to provide marketers with different insights. We wanted to figure out what (kinds of content) marketers found the most critical.” — Michele Linn, Content Marketing Institute vice president.

 

  • Ask yourself what kinds of stories you’d tell if you didn’t have to make money. Now tell those stories.
  • The most successful content marketers know success doesn’t happen overnight. You need to stick with it. This year’s data shows that.

“We have a lot of new data around people’s attitudes to content marketing and the people who are most successful have a strategy — they know what success looks like and they give it time.” — Michele Linn, Content Marketing Institute vice president.

 

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Jonathan Crossfield about avoiding epic social media mistakes.

 

And here’s a discussion about the world’s top content marketing projects, based on the Content Marketing Institute’s 2016 Awards.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.