Award-winning Australian journalist and thought-leader Waleed Aly has warned media companies against chasing viral content, claiming it will ultimately destroy trust with their audiences.

Today the Brand Newsroom team takes a close look at ‘short-termism’. Is being hungry for likes, shares, views and follows degrading our brands and risking our relationship with our most important asset — our customer?

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • Brands are losing focus on their business and trying to work out ‘how can we go viral; how can we get more likes?’ It’s better to focus on your business goals.
  • Audiences have got to a point where they’re ‘dumbed down’: they’re used to the “fast-food” version of content. We should still be tackling the more complicated content and creating it in a way that still appeals, and helping build the audience appetite for that.

‘Marketers are now behaving like advertisers used to behave, but without the finesse’. — Sarah

 

  • With the media collapsing there is less and less good information out there. That means now is a great opportunity to create quality, information-rich content. Brands can own a niche and become the world’s foremost authority in their area.

‘The media cycle is only going to get faster. You think it’s quick now, wait until you see it in six months from now’. — Nic

 

  • Mix in the ‘fast-food’ content with the quality content.
  • Brands don’t have to get caught up in the short-termism that’s plaguing traditional media. Keep producing quality content. Not every piece of content will be a winner with the audience, but keep creating excellent content as this will build trust with your audience when they do engage with it.
  • Long-form content is some of the most successful content that’s out there at the moment.

‘If you keep feeding them rubbish, you’re going to get rubbish at the other end’. — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need:

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Bernadette Jiwa about putting more love into your marketing.

 

And here’s a discussion about building personal brands.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

Australian demographer Bernard Salt caused outrage recently when he suggested millennials could afford to buy houses if they stopped spending money on smashed avocado on toast. Brands jumped on it, leveraging the publicity for their own business. Today, the Brand Newsroom team takes a look at marketing opportunism.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • Sometimes a little controversy isn’t a bad thing for your personal brand. If you know how to ride the wave, you can extend your awareness well beyond your usual reach.
  • There can also be an opportunity to hitch a ride on someone else’s controversy, if you respond in a way that supports your brand’s messages and connects well with your audience.

“There was lots of righteous indignation. Social media blew up. People in this demographic took big offence. That’s when Bernard Salt said ‘right, I’m going to take advantage of this and doubled-down and made it bigger and bigger’.” — Sarah

 

  • The only time an observation like Bernard Salt’s goes viral is when it really hurts — when it taps into the truth.
  • Courting controversy can polarize your audience. It can be dangerous for corporate brands. You can be offensive but don’t get your customers offside. You have more leeway with your personal brand.

“I subscribe to the idea that all news is good news. For Bernard Salt this is good because it helps him break into different markets.” — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic spoke to Bernadette Jiwa about putting the love back into marketing.

 

And here’s a discussion with Content Marketing Institute vice president Michele Linn about the CMI’s 2017 B2B content marketing trends report.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

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How do you avoid making epic social media mistakes? The team discusses one of their favourite topics with storyteller, marketer, and social media guru, Jonathan Crossfield. Among his many titles he’s the Editorial Director behind Telstra’s content hub, Smarter Business Ideas. He is fresh back from Content Marketing World in the US, where he presented a paper on social media and audience: “the proper approach to social communications”.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  • First, this isn’t a witch-hunt for bad social media examples. Looking at any kind of failure is about trying to learn the lessons. Often, you can learn more when something goes wrong than you can when it goes right. The fact things keep going wrong suggests we still have a lot to learn, so let’s learn from each other.
  • Jonathan’s suspicion about the social media mistakes made by big brands is that often they’ve been made by an agency or someone posting on behalf of a brand, rather than someone inside a brand. They may be a little too removed from a brand and less able to reflect the brand correctly — especially if posting has been left to inexperienced staff.

“It has become predictable that brands will run into these walls. You know they’re going to stuff up before they do. So if we can see it, why can’t they?” — Jonathan Crossfield

 

  • Connecting your brand to any kind of “bad news” almost always blows up in a brand’s face (metaphorically speaking). It’s certainly not a good idea to do it deliberately in order to “troll” the consumer because, as Jonathan explains, “you might get the sentiment but the numbers are going to be through the floor”.
  • Treat the emotions your audience are experiencing at the time with respect.

“It doesn’t matter if you didn’t mean offense; if the audience took offense, it was offensive.” — Jonathan Crossfield

 

  • We’ve become too fixated on getting big engagement numbers because big numbers look good on the report card you’re giving to your client. But numbers are only ever part of the story — we need to think about how the message actually resonates with the audience.
  • Social media and content marketing are long-term strategies and big engagement numbers are borne out of the old month-to-month campaigning thought processes. They shouldn’t be part of your long-term strategy because they don’t prove anything of value to your business. Think more about your messaging and resonance than about the reach.

“You need to focus on building your audience and serving your clients and quite frankly, if you’re trolling your audience, they will never engage with your brand again and they won’t say anything nice about you ever again.” — Sarah

 

Here are the links you might need

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at the lessons that can be learned from the world’s best examples of content marketing.

 

And here’s a fascinating discussion about the digital marketing strategies of the Clinton and Trump campaigns, based on an experiment Sarah conducted.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

Today the Brand Newsroom team looks at how brands use humour to interact with their customers on social media. Is it ever a good idea? Or can it spectacularly backfire? And, sometimes, are brands perhaps using humour in the hope they will “go viral”, rather than focusing on first marketing principles and giving customers the good service they expect.

 

First up, here’s the article about Tesco responding to the tweet about their mobile product.

  • Interacting with customers on social can be an opportunity to be funny but there’s also an opportunity to offend people — so be careful how you do it.
  • Sarcasm doesn’t work. People don’t like seeing that come from brands. Be self-effacing.
  • Don’t ever make fun of natural or human disasters.

“You could easily just ignore it but Tesco has jumped on it, they’ve seen it as an opportunity to be witty and capture some attention.” — James

 

  • Monitor how your brand name is being used on social and respond to it if necessary — whether that’s with humour or not.
  • Consumers like it when two brands interact on social with humour.

“You don’t want to offend people, you want to bring people along.” — Sarah

 

  • While marketing managers might want to “go viral”, it’s not always in the best interest of the brand. Ask yourself why you’re doing it before you try to “go viral”.
  • If you’re going to use humour it should be part of your strategy — know how you’re going to use it, have guidelines, stick to them.
  • Have some courage. It can pay off.

“There are certain brands out there that try a little too hard. It’s very obvious and you will pay for it.” — Nic

 

Here are the links you might need

  • Sarah mentioned Mention, the social media monitoring service. You can find it here.
  • Here’s an article about the Greggs and Google back-and-forth from a couple of years ago.
  • If you want to know more about Charmin’s #tweetfromtheseat, check out this article.
  • You can #dunkinthedark with Oreo’s here. And the movie theatre’s reply is here.
  • Take a look at Black Milk Clothing’s social media humour disaster here. And here’s Luton Airport’s.
  • Here’s James’s hilarious example of a pun-filled (and rather fishy) Twitter exchange.
  • But really, the most fun you will have today is watching the John West ad Nic mentioned (it has actually been voted “the best ad of all time” in some polls).

 

Have you heard the one about…

Here’s James, Sarah and Nic’s discussion with Jordana Borensztijn about using humour in your content…

 

And here’s a discussion from last week about dealing with PR disasters…

 

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.

 

This week, a video of a woman trying on a Star Wars Chewbacca mask took the internet by storm. With almost 140 million views at last count, Candace Payne’s Facebook video has become the most popular Facebook Live video of all time.  

In an equally impressive feat, the Brand Kohl’s, where the mask was purchased, responded quickly. Allegedly the mask is now sold out in stores around the world.

So what about this video is an example of social media done right, and what can other brands learn from this video about influencer marketing an authenticity? The brand newsroom team discuss.

Show Notes

Here are some key take-outs:

  • Authenticity is key to effective influencer marketing
  • Viral videos can rarely be constructed

“We overthink things sometimes, and sometimes just getting in the car is the correct approach.” — James 

  • Humour is a great way to build an audience
  • Viewers seek out good news

“We needed something to lighten us up… Sometimes people just want to laugh” — Nic

  • Inauthenticity can be a death sentence to a brand
  • Influencers need to be carefully selected

“Brands are so hot to get involved in influencer marketing. Are you paying too much money? Are you getting the results you should, and is the person that you’re engaging really going to do anything for your brand? — Sarah

Here are the links you might need

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic were joined by Kohen Grogan to discuss how to measure return on investment on social media

And here’s a discussion about how to effectively market with a limited budget

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Subscribe or leave a review.