Content Marketing World has wrapped up in the U.S. for another year and a highlight of that is always the Content Marketing Awards which honour the very best examples of content marketing in the world. The Brand Newsroom team takes a close look at what the best content marketers are doing and what lessons there are for the rest of us.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

  •  Keep your finger off the selling button. Your articles should provide information, not push product. 
  •  Build trust with your audience first. Build your reputation as a publisher.

“People get tired of people selling to them.” — Nic

  •  You can still make sales from your content marketing — that is after all the point of marketing — you just have to be clever about it. A hyperlink to a product page can build revenue without bashing the consumer over the head with an obvious call-to-action.
  •  Use the content to build your subscriber base then market directly to the subscriber base via email.

“The money play for brands is not in the news, it is not to always be selling, but to be really strategic and think about the audience and that subscriber base. That’s where you can really sell to them, on the email.” — Sarah

  •  The lesson from Sainsbury’s content marketing project win is to know your audience. They have 50,000 magazine readers every week with a 35 per cent open rate and a 31 per cent click-through rate which says people value it and when they see it, they open it. Why? Because Sainsbury’s is getting the content right.
  •  Do one thing really well. Sainsbury’s mastered the magazine and built their audience before they moved into other areas.
  •  View yourself as a media company. It’s a change in mindset but it will pay dividends, as Marriott Hotels has shown.

“The theme through all of these is how much respect each of these organisations has for their audience and for building that audience.” — Sarah

 

Here are the links you might need

  •  Here’s a link to the Traction News
  •  The Content Marketing Institute’s Joe Pulizzi took a deep dive into all the CMWorld “project of the year” finalists here
  •  Sarah mentioned a Contently article about hotelier Marriott calling themselves a media company. You can read that here
  •  And here’s the link to that social media governance survey for West Australian companies, Sarah mentioned at the end of the podcast.


Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at the digital marketing strategies of the Clinton and Trump campaigns in the current United States election.

And here’s a discussion about the differences between pitching a story idea to public and commercial media outlets.

 

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The US Presidential race is well and truly under way, with Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump campaigning relentlessly for support. Rather than yet another discussion of politics, today the team took a closer look at the marketing strategies of each candidate. Sarah Mitchell was recently in the US and signed up to the campaigns of both Trump and Clinton to see who was winning the campaign from a marketing perspective.

 

 

Here are some key take-outs:

 

  • Clinton’s website provides a large array of merchandising options, whereas Trump sticks to a few basic staples of buttons, signs, hats and T-shirts.
  • Supporters wanting to buy merchandise also have to provide personal details, including home and email addresses. This information was then used by both parties to target the supporter.

“This is something that companies generally don’t do very well in terms of the follow up: they get the email address and then they never correspond again.” — James

 

  • Both candidates embrace email correspondence enthusiastically. Trump sent out upwards of 60 emails that all followed the same set template and said the same basic information. On perhaps a positive note, Trump’s message is kept simple and to the point.
  • Clinton’s campaign involves an even greater quantity of emails but with different formats and varying content. Influencer marketing features strongly with the Obamas, Anna Wintour and Barbara Streisand lending support. There is also an emphasis on fundraising from Clinton’s camp.

“The 40 years of political experience (of Clinton) is really showing here in its style and quality.” — Nic

 

  • It’s rare that you see two companies side-by-side competing for the same goal. This experiment provided a unique opportunity to compare and contrast marketing methods of direct competitors
  • Clinton requests for money from supporters, starting at just $1, whereas Trump does not explicitly ask for any funds.

“Hillary wins hands-down. More personalised, more varied… I know a lot about her campaign. I know a lot about what she stands for, about the policies that are important to her. With Trump, all I get from him is he needs me to come to his appearances and he’s really good at name-calling.” — Sarah

 

Here are the links you might need

  • Sarah’s original blog on the marketing tactics of Trump and Clinton, that James mentioned early on, can be found here.

 

Have you heard the one about…

Recently James, Sarah and Nic took a close look at PR disasters.

 

And here’s a discussion about who we trust, and why.

 

Like what you’ve heard?

Give us a follow on Soundcloud to get the latest episodes.

Or, you can subscribe or leave a review on iTunes.